Interview Tips: Top 6 Things NOT to do in Your Job Search

Although the economy has shown some recent signs of recovery, the current unemployment rate stands at 7.5 percent.

Since there are plenty of obstacles standing in your way to a new job, it’s imperative to hone your approach. See if you’re making any of these job-hunting mistakes, and fix them before it’s too late:

1. Not proofreading your résumé The quality of your résumé is what forms most potential employers’ first impression of you and opens the door to job interviews, so it’s important to make sure it’s perfect. Whether you create one on your own or have it professionally prepared is up to you; just be sure it is 100 percent error-free.

In addition to making the paper version of your résumé perfect, make sure the one you send via email delivers without any messed-up formatting or funny breaks. To create a version of your résumé that can be embedded in the body of an email, remove all current formatting by opening your résumé and saving it as a plain text (.txt) file — and remember to click on the box that says “insert line breaks.” Then, reopen it with the Notepad program. Be sure that all of the text is flush with the left-hand side of the document, and ensure that you have used only clear, easy-to-read fonts. Save that version and you’re done. Email it to yourself to review what it looks like when it arrives.

2. Becoming discouraged Searching for a job can be difficult and lonely. You may interview with dozens of companies, never to hear from them again, and you may experience many unreturned phone calls as well. In the midst of all this adversity, it’s important to maintain a positive attitude and an upbeat outlook. Becoming discouraged only works against you.

If you’re unemployed, you probably have some free time on your hands. Spend a portion of it to keep your attitude and outlook healthy. Stay in shape, stay connected to friends, join networking groups and learn new skills to add to your résumé. These types of activities can keep you motivated and reduce the amount of time you have to become discouraged.

3. Telling the whole world you’re looking for work This is especially true if you’re employed. If your boss finds out that you’re thinking about leaving, he could speed up the process by giving you the boot. The last thing you want is to lose your current position before you’ve found a new one. Keep your job search to yourself.

4. Using a singular strategy If you want to find a job quickly, search for leads in every way possible. For instance, 36 million people used social media to find a job in 2011. If you’ve been ignoring that avenue, start checking sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn regularly for job announcements. Checking job boards is also a good idea, but if you’re intent on working for a particular company, consider showing up in person. You may not land a job interview, but you’ll at least get your face in front of someone, which could lead to an opportunity down the road.

5. Underestimating the power of networking While some job events and career fairs may seem like a waste of time, you never know where your next key contact will come from. Embrace networking as a major piece of your job-hunting strategy. Join or become more active in professional groups. You may also want to volunteer for functions with your professional networking group. This is a great way to stay involved and get noticed by the movers and shakers in your field.

6. Forgetting to keep all points of contact professional Whether it’s the voice-mail greeting on your cellphone or the appearance of your social media pages, make sure everything looks and sounds immaculately professional. If employers interested in you, be assured that they will investigate you, and that includes visiting your online profiles. If you have anything that you wouldn’t feel comfortable with an employer — or your mother — seeing online, either remove it or be sure that your privacy settings on Facebook prohibit an employer from seeing it. That way, you present yourself in the best light possible.

Final thoughts Remember, many of your job-search expenses are tax-deductible: résumé preparation fees, paper supplies and postage, the cost of gas needed to drive to interviews, and more. Consult the IRS website for a complete list of details and restrictions, and hold onto your receipts. Finding work may be your top priority right now, but you’ll thank yourself for reducing your tax burden once you’re employed.

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What Clients Say About Patrice & Associates

  • Amy is genuine, honest and has a passion for what she does.

    Amy contacted me in a time where I was unhappy where I was but wasn’t doing anything to change it. She was very informative and if she didn’t have the information at hand, she got it. She revamped an old resume making it more about achievements than responsibilities. She coached me on interview tactics before multiple interviews and was there to talk about them afterwards. Every conversation we had felt more like a friendship than business. She is genuine, honest and has a passion for what she does. She also helped boost my confidence through the entire interview progress. Whatever she is doing, she must be doing it right because I got the job! Thanks Amy for a life changing experience.
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    Shawn Ware
    Amy is genuine, honest and has a passion for what she does.
  • I really appreciate Tim for all his handwork and consistency.

    He saw a lot of potential in me which allowed me to apply for a higher position than I had first intended. Although the process wasn't easy he was still very honest and trustworthy. I am very grateful to have received his guidance. I really appreciate Tim for all his handwork and consistency.
  • I want to thank Tim...

    ...for all the time he spent helping me acquire my new career. He has helped by assisting me with redesigning my resume and keeping in contact with me throughout the entire process.  His actions showed that he really cared and wanted the best for me. Thanks again, Dominic Almanza I want to thank Tim
  • I would 100% recommend Ross

    I cannot begin to thank Ross and Karen enough! without the two of them I wouldn't have even known about the position! The interview process was quick, easy and simple. After only a short week I was in a position I knew I was going to love forever and it was all thanks to them! Ross has been so good about following up with me even after being hired, asking how my experience has been, what hours I'm working etc. and to top it all off Ross even sent me a gift card thanking me for working with him. I would 100% recommend Ross to anyone looking for a career in the industry!
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    Bayley Ferreira
    I would 100% recommend Ross
  • I had the pleasure of working with Doug Lockwood

    Doug was extremely professional and was very easy to work with. He was quick to respond, made himself available anytime I had a question, and was always checking in through the entire process. He coached me through the interview process by sending over necessary documents to read over on my own time, giving pointers on the phone, and talking through details. You can tell Doug cares for each person he works with. Even after getting the job, he is still checking in to see how things are going and making sure all is going well. I would recommend Doug to anyone when looking to start their career or looking for a career change. He was a great resource to have when needed.
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    Tony
    I had the pleasure of working with Doug Lockwood