Use Numbers to Highlight Your Accomplishments

Suppose you’re a hiring manager looking at resumes. Which of the following statements would impress you more?

  • Wrote news releases.
  • Wrote 25 news releases in a three-week period under daily deadlines.

Clearly, the second statement carries more weight. Why? Because it uses numbers to quantify the writer’s accomplishment, giving it a context that helps the interviewer understand the degree of difficulty involved in the task.

Numbers are powerful resume tools that will help your accomplishments get the attention they deserve from prospective employers. With just a little thought, you can find effective ways to quantify your successes on your resume. Here are a few suggestions:

Think Money

Organizations are and always will be concerned about money. So as you contemplate your accomplishments and prepare to present them on your resume, think about ways you’ve saved, earned or managed money in your internships, part-time jobs and extracurricular activities so far. A few possibilities that might appear on a typical resume:

  • Identified, researched and recommended a new Internet service provider, cutting the company’s online costs by 15 percent.
  • Wrote prospect letter that has brought in more than $25,000 in donations so far.
  • Managed a student organization budget of more than $7,000.

Think Time

You’ve heard the old saying, “Time is money,” and it’s true. Companies and organizations are constantly looking for ways to save time and do things more efficiently. They’re also necessarily concerned about meeting deadlines, both internal and external. So whatever you can do on your resume to show that you can save time, make time or manage time will grab your reader’s immediate attention. Here are some time-oriented entries that might appear on a typical resume:

  • Assisted with twice-monthly payroll activities, ensuring employees were paid as expected and on time.
  • Suggested procedures that decreased average order-processing time from 10 minutes to five minutes.

Think Amounts

It’s very easy to neglect mentioning how much or how many of something you’ve produced or overseen. There’s a tendency instead to simply pluralize your accomplishments — e.g., “wrote news releases” or “developed lesson plans” -– without including important specifics — e.g., “wrote 25 news releases” or “developed lesson plans for two classes of 20 students each.”

Don’t fall into the trap of excluding numbers. Instead, include amounts, like these:

  • Recruited 25 members for a new student environmental organization.
  • Trained five new employees on restaurant operations procedures.
  • Created process that bolstered production 25 percent

The more you focus on money, time and amounts in relation to your accomplishments, the better you’ll present your successes and highlight your potential — and the more you’ll realize just how much you really have to offer prospective employers. Add it all up, and you’ll see that playing the numbers game is yet another way to convince employers that you should be a part of their equation for success.

 

Back

What Clients Say About Patrice & Associates

  • Jonathan Litt was an amazing coach during my job search.

    The thing that stands out to me the most is you can tell he truly cares. He helped me gain self confidence through phone calls and was constantly checking in on me during the interview process. Not only was I able to acquire a great job with the help of Jonathan, but I received incredible insight. He is a very smart guy and is able to effectively explain his thoughts in a simple manner.          

    Thank you so much!

    Jacque J.

    Jonathan Litt was an amazing coach during my job search.
  • Karen Horton is personable, knowledgeable, and was instrumental to my Career Goals.

    Communication and correspondence with her was easy and fast and her feedback always proved very useful during the recruitment process.  With other recruiters I have dealt with in the past, I've usually had the impression that I was merely part of a quota of applications. This was not so with Karen, I am convinced that she had my best interest in mind as well as those of the company she was "hunting" me for.    

    I cannot thank Karen enough for all her assistance in what I am sure will be a long lasting relationship with my new employer.

    Regards,

    Carlos

    Karen Horton is personable, knowledgeable, and was instrumental to my Career Goals.
  • Ross Horton is the definition of what a professional account manager should aspire to be!

    He finds ways to help that best suits his candidate, now that takes passion for helping people! The way that he engages with his clients is truly rare to find. If you have the chance to work with him. Do it!

    Thank you,  Ross Horton and Patrice & Associates!

    Joel Rodriguez

    Ross Horton is the definition of what a professional account manager should aspire to be!
  • Dionne Spriggens is the definition of Dedicated!

    Dionne Spriggens is doing a great job with exceptional service.  Dionne is amazing with her persistence and the positive vibes she brings.  Since I the first time I spoke with her she has been nothing but professional and dedicated.

    I strongly believe that she will be a great asset to Patrice & Associates for many more years to come!

    Best regards

    Bovon L.

    Dionne Spriggens is the definition of Dedicated!
  • Shawn Hoye needs a raise!

    Shawn Hoye went above and beyond in matching me with a position and company that was best suited for me. He is passionate about what he does, and is with you every single step of the way. I would highly recommend Shawn Hoye and Patrice & Associates.          

    Thank you!

    Melissa

    Shawn Hoye needs a raise!