Common Interview Questions

Patrice & Associates Common Interview Questions Tips For Candidates

Tell me about yourself.” 
Don’t recite your autobiography. Instead, describe your greatest skills as a hospitality manager, accomplishments and qualifications as they relate to the job requirements. Indicate how you have saved them time and money or implemented any new procedures.

“Describe your strengths and weaknesses.”
This one’s a classic. Describing your strengths is always the easy part. Try to pick out a few strong points and back them up with specific examples, such as “why” you are a team player. Now comes the hard part. Zooming in on your weaknesses is never pleasant, so don’t dwell on them. And make sure to turn negative experiences into positive ones by reflecting on lessons learned. REFRAIN FROM BEING A “PEOPLE PERSON”. You can do better than that.

“Where do you want to be in three to five years?” 
This is essentially a hospitality career goal question. However, the interviewer might also want to see if you’re the type to jump ship in six months. Try and ease their concerns by stating your desire to progress within the position and company. PLEASE MAKE SURE THAT NO CONVERSATION OF RETURNING TO SCHOOL OR OPENING YOUR OWN RESTAURANT COMES INTO THE CONVERSATION. It raises a RED flag. This will only turn the company off. It will appear to them that you are not a long-term manager. LONG TERM goals need to include you working for the company with which you are interviewing and THAT is all.

“What made you decide to apply for this position?”
Briefly explain how your current restaurant management skills match the stated requirements for the position. Be sure to include how you were attracted to the organization based on what you discovered while researching the company.  Make certain you have visited the website and eaten in their restaurant recently.

“Describe your major successes or failures.”
Use the same strategy as in the strengths and weaknesses question. Recount scenarios and anecdotes about how you achieved success. On the flip side, downplay your failures by discussing how you used them to better understand a business challenge or life lessons.

“I noticed you have had three different jobs in the past four years. Why did you make so many changes in such a short period of time?”
If you have a history of job-hopping, employers are going to notice and ask about it. The best thing to do is focus on the positives. Starting with, “My boss was a total jerk,” is not a good way to get the ball rolling. Instead, say something upbeat like, “I was looking for a bigger challenge,” or “I wanted to enhance my skills.” If you were fired from a job, don’t lie about it; inevitably it will come back to haunt you.

“What do you know about XYZ Company? Or the industry in general?”
Once again, this is where your company research will come in handy. Make a positive impression by demonstrating your knowledge along with the fact you did some homework prior to the interview.

“What would your peers/boss say about you?”
Concentrate on positive relationships you have developed with various types of people from peers to management. Now is also a good time to site examples of how you have helped others or worked in a team environment.

“Tell me how you prioritize projects when you have several assignments due at one time.”
This question addresses your organizational skills. Be sure to give examples of deadlines you have met under pressure and how you accomplished the required tasks.

“Why should we hire you?”
This is one of the most basic questions. If you have prepared for the interview, it should be an easy one to answer. Tie together your top accomplishments and experiences relative to the position you are applying for, along with reasons why you are different from your peers.

“Based on our discussion, what questions do you have about the company or position?”
Hopefully, you took our advice when we told you about what to ask the employer. Even if the interviewer did a fantastic job explaining the facts, you should always have some additional questions to pose. Try personalizing it by asking what drew them to the company and their vision of where the corporation is going.

“What kind of salary are you expecting?”
It’s best to say “my recruiter told me the range of the position and I am fine with that.  I’m more interested in growing with your company for the future than what I will earn tomorrow.”

What Clients Say About Patrice & Associates

  • Delanie is definitely someone who can open doors to growth and future. Her commitment and passion speaks louder than words. She made sure there was constant communication and that I always was ready, well prepared and taken care of also. Not only did I enjoy working with her, but she has also created a new world of opportunities. Her work ethics, commitment, connections and knowledge takes a person to another level of betterment and understanding success. Delanie is DEFINITELY someone to keep, respect and appreciate because she makes sure to give you the same in return. She is a guardian Angel!
    Thank you. Respectfully, Anita M
    Delanie is a guardian Angel! 
  • Delanie was fantastic. Everything was smooth and she is fun, she is available and she has great energy. Giorgio Riccobono Delanie was fantastic.
  • Delanie was very professional and understanding during the whole process. She was always available when needed, also walk me through all steps to make sure I was ready for interviews and calls. Giovani Varela Delanie was very professional and understanding during the whole process. 
  • Clint reached out to me at my work one day and he was so passionate,so professional and very helpful. He helped me put together a very solid strong resume based on my experience and my likes. I’m very happy he reached out, very happy to work with him and now I will soon be part of a great company that I see my future been amazing in this industry. Thanks again Clint I will always be happy I chose this company. You made everything much better and much easier for me. Jessy Benitez Thanks again Clint
  • I received a call from Clint, after he introduced himself he told me about a job he thought I would be perfect for. A franchise of the company I had previously worked for. What he was about to find out was I interviewed with them and tanked it. Yes, I tanked an interview with a company I spent 9 years working for. You have to understand I've only had 2 jobs in 20 years so and I was nervous and wasn’t sure what to expect, I also thought my work experience with the company would be doing some of the talking for me. Clint said he would be in touch if anything came up. I thought that was the end of it. A few days later he called and helped me rewrite my resume to get the best of what I did that I didn’t think was that important onto paper. He called with another opportunity and set up the interview. Clint didn’t just set up an interview, he called the day before and spent an hour of his time prepping me for it. We went over the list of questions he sent that he thought would be asked and questions I should ask. I was more relaxed and the interview went well. I got a call 3 days later after they finished up the rest of the interviews and was offered the job. I called Clint and told him the good news, and that he wouldn’t have to deal with me anymore. Instead I was told he would be there throughout my training and the transition into the position. It’s awesome to know that someone is there to talk to if needed.  I truly believe I got the job because of Clint. I know I did on my merits but Clint was a huge help. Who would have thought one and done. I would recommend Clint Carpenter and Patrice and Associates to anyone.   Bethanne Volz
    I would recommend Clint Carpenter and Patrice and Associates to anyone.