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Patrice Rice featured in Business News Daily

Posted on September 27, 2017 at 4:33 PM

Seasonal Hiring: 6 Tips for Employers

 

This article was written by Saige Driver and originally featured on  the Business News Daily’s website. View the original article here.

 

The holidays can be the most wonderful time of the year. But if you are a business owner, it can also be the most stressful. Business picking up during the holiday season is great, but days like Black Friday can put a strain on the employees who are left doing the extra work.

Many small businesses combat this by hiring seasonal help. However, there are some important things to consider, as regulations for hiring short-term workers differ from hiring regular full-time employees. No matter what stage of growth you’re in, here are a few things to keep in mind when looking for short-term workers.

 

Carisa Miklusak, CEO of tilr, suggests creating a seasonal hiring strategy, just as you would for other business initiatives.

“It’s easy to get behind with a seasonal hiring strategy and having a timeline of who needs hired by when, but holding your internal team accountable to the strategy can define your success,” she said.

It’s important to start the hiring process early, because you want adequate time to train your new employees. For example, if you need extra staff for the holiday season, start advertising for it as soon as summer is over, said Steve Pritchard, HR consultant for giffgaff.

“You need to be realistic about how long your seasonal staff will need to get to grips with their responsibilities, and it’s better to be safe than sorry,” he said.

 

Worker classification is an incredibly important part of taking on any hired help. Depending on the type of business you run, you may have a choice between bringing in a regular employee and an independent contractor.

“Whether it’s long- or short-term, judge your demand and decide which [type of worker] you need,” said Steve DelVecchia, founder of online staffing platform Adaptive Professional Solutions.

A worker’s status is usually dictated by the level of control the employer has over the individual’s daily tasks, as well as the worker’s overall contributions to the business. The key difference is that employees are listed on payroll and covered by a company’s benefits and insurance, whereas contractors are not. This can make a huge difference in the time and money you spend bringing a particular worker into your business. [Are you familiar with these important business labor laws?]

 

Companies increasingly use social media to find the best and brightest full-time talent. C.J. Reuter, advisory board member for social recruiting solution Work4, said that social media can also be a great recruiting tool for employers who need seasonal help.

“Leverage what your marketing team has already done to market yourself as an employer on social media,” Reuter told Business News Daily. “Social media shows [candidates] what it’s like to be there. You can publish photos on social networks showing the behind-the-scenes, day-to-day culture. It’s more believable, especially to the younger generation.”

Since seasonal hiring tends to be very geo-specific, you can use social media to find qualified candidates in your local area and reach out to them throughout the year, Reuter said. This will put your company on local workers’ radar when they’re looking for a part-time seasonal job or internship.

Patrice Rice, CEO and founder of Patrice & Associates, advises using social media and word of mouth to find potential seasonal employees. “Do not underestimate the power of word-of-mouth recruiting,” she told Business News Daily. “When recruiting candidates, be clear on the length of the assignment as well as the responsibilities that come with the position.”

 

Since seasonal hires are frequently part-time and will only spend a few months with you, it’s easy to forget what this means for your insurance policy. Don’t assume all your workers are automatically covered.

“It’s important to look out for all workers, regardless of employment status,” said Steve Carlson, vice president of select workers’ compensation for Travelers Insurance‘s small commercial department. “Think about what insurance coverage you need and don’t need, and what the cost will be [if you don’t have it].”

Carlson advised speaking with your insurance agent about the types of employees you’re taking on – part-time, full-time, paid interns, volunteers, etc. – and finding out what that means in terms of your local labor laws. Depending on their status, employees may not be covered by your workers’ compensation policy, so you’ll need to research the proper steps to take should they be injured on the job.

 

Although they will only work with you temporarily, you and your seasonal hires should get the most out of that time. Once you’ve hired the right people for the position, train them efficiently and well so they can do the best job possible.

“Bringing someone new on is about training them and making sure they understand what’s involved in the job,” said Scott Humphrey, director of technical services in Travelers’ risk control department. “They’re eager to do a good job and get something done as quickly as possible, but as an employer, you want them to take their time and do it right. Supervise them and give them feedback about what to do and not do – the same way you would treat any employee.”

 

It’s important to keep a positive work environment because it keeps employees happy, and cared-for workers are more productive.

“Keep in mind that successful temporary hires may return to the business next season, turn into customers and/or be a good referral sources for the future,” Rice told Business News Daily. “Be sure to build a positive relationship between the business and employee. Think about the different ways that you can value their hard work, such as offering perks like discounts and/or a competitive wage.”

A way to create a positive work environment is to include seasonal help in events and competitions going on in the company to make them feel part of the team, Miklusak said.

“Including seasonal employees in company events that happen during their time with the organization, competitions and/or simple office building practices can go a long way in helping seasonal employees feel acclimated and included,” she wrote.

At the end of the season, have an offboarding program, which allows seasonal employees to give valuable feedback.

“Make sure that you have an offboarding program, including exit interviews,” said Miklusak. “Having exit interviews allows you to recruit for the next season, learn how to improve the experience for next season’s workers and provide departing resources.”

 

Additional reporting by Nicole Fallon. Some source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article.







Patrice & Associates Recognizes Top Achievers at Annual Convention

Posted on July 20, 2017 at 4:02 PM

Nation’s Leading Talent Acquisition Firm Serving the Hospitality Industry Celebrates Outstanding Growth and Successes Among its Team of Franchisees and Regional Developers

 

DUNKIRK, Md. – Patrice & Associates, the nation’s leading talent acquisition firm that specializes in the hospitality industry, celebrated system-wide growth and several franchisees and regional developers at the company’s annual franchise convention held earlier this month at the Double Tree Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland.

Themed “Breakthrough to Excellence,” the convention included educational and breakout sessions on a variety of topics pertaining to client management and operations, as well as roundtable sessions and a client panel discussion with executives from Panera, Pret A Manger and Glory Days.

“It was an awe-inspiring feeling to witness our sessions packed with franchisees and regional developers alike, all focused on one goal – moving the needle. Everyone left the conference motivated with best practices and game-changing strategies, equipped to take action,” said Patrice Rice, founder and CEO of Patrice & Associates. “The outlook for Patrice & Associates is nothing but bright, and we couldn’t thank our franchisees, regional developers and corporate support team enough for their hard work and dedication to our brand. They’re an amazing group and we can’t wait to see them take their businesses to new heights.”

Patrice & Associates has been serving the hospitality industry for nearly 30 years, and currently has more than 100 offices throughout North America. The company is widely considered the gold standard in hospitality recruiting with an impressive list of more than 500 national clients in the restaurant and hotel industries including Buffalo Wild Wings, Panera, Arby’s and HMSHost.

Top achievers recognized at the Patrice & Associates awards dinner include:

 

Franchisee of the Year – Corina Mack

Regional Developer of the Year – Mercedes Concepcion-Gray & Jay Gray

Diamond Club – Corina Mack, Frank Rondeau & Ian Dietrich, Scott Jacobson, Mercedes Concepcion-Gray & Jay Gray, Ty Clifton and Scott Lowry

Platinum Club – Norma Tyree, Matt & Aida Lopez, Helen Nourai, Gary & Paula Bernard and Gary Tietz

President’s Club – Liz Costa, Sharri Romero, George & Sue Wooten, Dan Harris, Mike Cinamon, Van Wilhite, Karl Busch and Michael Selleh

Gold Client – Mike Cinamon, Corina Mack, Helen Nourai and Frank Rondeau & Ian Dietrich

Highest Placement Fees Over $10,000 – Mercedes Concepcion-Gray & Jay Gray, Helen Nourai, Michael Selleh, Norma Tyree, Tom Schmitt, Frank Rondeau & Ian Dietrich, Dan Harris, Ken Welch and Matt & Aida Lopez

Highest Average Placement Fee – Norma Tyree and Michael Selleh

Business Development Excellence Award – Vicki Marshall, Jase Doane, Scott Lowry and Ty Clifton

Excellence in Marketing Award – Frank Rondeau & Ian Dietrich, Joanne Gimelli and Corina Mack

Account Manager Award – Corina Mack and Mike Cinamon

Brand Ambassador Award – Vicki Marshall and George & Sue Wooten

Leadership Award – Michelle Shriver and Helen Nourai

Business Vision Award – Marcus Williams, Mark Rubick, Ty Clifton, Arnetra Shettleworth

Turning the Tide Award – Vann Wilhite, Monica & Brent Troxel, Matt & Aida Lopez, Mike Thompson and Ken & Celene Schreifels

Fast Start Award – Margo Kornfield and Amanda Hebert

 

About Patrice & Associates

As the premier hospitality talent acquisition firm in the United States since 1989, Patrice & Associates helps thousands of managerial candidates every year find rewarding jobs in the restaurant and hospitality industry. The company, founded by Patrice Rice, has exclusive recruiting partnerships with some the nation’s largest restaurant chains and hotels to ensure those hospitality venues recruit the top managers in their industry. Currently, there are 100 franchise units throughout North America and more than 250 recruiters. Patrice & Associates is currently on track to open 350 new franchise offices by 2022. For more information on Patrice & Associates, visit www.patriceandassociates.com.







Restaurant Operators plan to expand

Posted on June 27, 2017 at 2:44 PM

Jonathan Maze of Nation’s Restaurant News posted an article yesterday highlighting the findings of the 2017 American Express Restaurant Trader Survey. The survey reached out and polled 488 owners, managers, directors, an CEO’s of independently owned restaurants. One surprising finding is the optimism that many restaurant operators still possess despite recent sales trends across the nation.

More than half of restaurant operators and managers, 54 percent, said their revenue is up over where it was a year ago. And 72 percent said they expect revenue to increase over the next year.

And 83 percent of operators said they plan to hire, while roughly a third of operators said they plan to seek financing over the next 12 months to expand or add technology.

Other than sheer optimism and plans to expand, the survey also uncovered a few other noteworthy findings.

“Delivery is a big deal to Millennials: According to the survey, 68 percent of Millennials ordered delivery over the past month. By comparison, only 36 percent of Baby Boomers ordered delivery.

To be sure, more than half of consumers prefer dining out, while only 29 percent prefer takeout and only 12 percent prefer delivery from a delivery service. And Abrams noted that many Millennials like delivery because they have families and don’t have the time to prepare the food.

And 58 percent recently used an ordering and delivery service like Grubhub, compared to 35 percent of Generation Xers and 21 percent of Baby Boomers. “

“People still like humans. The vast majority of consumers, 75 percent, prefer restaurants with in-person service versus digital platforms.

But again, Millennials are OK with the tech: 39 percent prefer digital customer service, while 28 percent of Gen X and 12 percent of Baby Boomers prefer digital.”

“Go local. Consumers like local ingredients. More than half, 56 percent, said it’s important for restaurants to use locally sourced ingredients.

By comparison, 44 percent of restaurants currently used locally sourced ingredients, but another 39 percent are planning to do so.”







2016: A Tough Year for the Restaurant Industry

Posted on February 8, 2017 at 7:43 PM

A Tough Year for the Restaurant Industry:

 

Last year proved to be difficult for the restaurant industry. Nation’s Restaurant News reported yesterday that Buffalo Wild Wing’s fourth quarter net earnings plummeted 38.2%. The company’s fourth quarter ended on December 25th, 2016. Company-owned restaurants saw same-store sales fall 4% while franchised stores saw sales fall 3.9%. Buffalo Wild Wings CEO Sally Smith made a statement about the issue, citing “the challenging restaurant environment” as the source of struggle. Chipotle also took a hard hit in their fourth quarter. As the company dealt with food borne illness outbreaks across the country, net incomes fell 76%.

 
It is no surprise that restaurants nationwide faced similar hardships. For many restaurants, the overall decline in net profits can be traced back to two main contributing factors: weak same-store sales and slow traffic. According to the National Restaurant Association, 42% of operators reported a same-stores sales decline in December of 2016. Operators also reported a 47% decline in traffic for that same month.

 
Expectations and optimism remain high, though, for the year ahead. About 39% of restaurant operators told National Restaurant News that they expect same-store sales and traffic to improve within the next 6 months. This is a 25% jump from when operators were surveyed back in October of 2016. Also heartening for the industry is that 57% of restaurant operators surveyed expect to expand or remodel within the next 6 months.

Dedicated to Success in 2017:

 
Here at Patrice and Associates, we are also optimistic about the year ahead. As the nation’s leading hospitality recruiting firm, we know how fundamentally important staffing is to a restaurant’s success. Finding strong, talented candidates to fill leadership positions can make all the difference when running an effective business. Strong leaders help shape a business’s culture and can be instrumental in improving overall service, efficiency, profitability, and more.

 
Overall, we are excited to continue working hard in 2017. Every day, our dedicated Franchisees and Recruiters help find and place the restaurant industry’s top leaders. By ensuring the success of our clients, we are also ensuring the growth and prosperity of the restaurant industry itself. We look forward to continue doing so now and for many years to come.