ARE YOU PLANNING OUT YOUR LIFE OR IS SOMEONE ELSE?

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If you don’t know where you’re going, you will never get there

It’s no coincidence that many Olympic Gold Medal Winners saw themselves wearing a gold medal around their neck, years before they competed

It’s no coincidence that Michael Jordan himself as a great basketball player even after he was told by his coach that he was not good enough to play high school basketball.

It’s surprising that Walt Disney went bankrupt 7 times and was fired from a job for not having enough creativity.

Anything you really wanted in life, you have achieved. When you know what you want, you do whatever it takes to make it happen.

Think for a moment about your current reality:

  • Are you earning the income you deserve?
  • Do you live in your dream home?
  • Are you driving the car of your dreams?
  • Have you provided a wonderful life for the people you love?
  • Do you travel to your favorite destinations?
  • Are your investments building a sound financial future?
  • Do you know your current net worth?
  • Have you set up a trust to protect your assets?
  • Do you know what you want written on your tombstone? If you answered no to any of the questions, it’s time to take control of your life and your future destiny.

It is important to know the legacy you will or will not leave.

Maybe it’s time for you to take control of your future and be in business for yourself.  Our work from home or office franchise may be something you should think about exploring.

 

Patrice & Associates’ Nashville Office Achieves National Recognition

Patrice & Associates’ Nashville Office Achieves National Recognition

The Nation’s Leading Restaurant and Hospitality Industry Staffing Company
Presents Local Recruiter with the “Highest Placement Runner-Up Award”

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Patrice & Associates, the nation’s largest hospitality recruiting firm, brought franchise partners and corporate leadership together for its annual convention and awards ceremony. The three-day event was held recently in Baltimore, Maryland.

During the event, Kathy Borum, a recruiter with Patrice & Associates’ Nashville office, was presented with the 2015 “Highest Placement Runner-Up Award.”

“Our team is incredibly proud of Kathy,” said Courtney Vanderveer, regional developer with Patrice & Associates and franchise owner of the brand’s Nashville office. “She is an incredible recruiter with a natural talent for screening and sourcing top managerial talent. If anyone deserves this honor, it’s her.”

Themed “Choose Success,” the convention celebrated several key accomplishments and inspired all attendees – franchisees, local market team members and corporate leadership – to continue to aim high and think big for their clients. The three days included extensive sales and marketing training, educational seminars, and opportunities to share best practices.

The awards dinner proved to be the highlight of the gathering, as Patrice & Associates’ leadership team handed out honors to top performing franchise partners and their team members in attendance for placements, client retention and best practices over the past 12 months.

Patrice & Associates’ coveted “Highest Placement Runner-Up Award” is given to the recruiter who has the highest actual placement fee (single fee) over the targeted 12-month period. The award recipient should consistently secure high fees.

“I am humbled to receive such a prestigious recognition,” Borum said. “I am excited to celebrate this accomplishment with my family, team members, and our excellent customers.”

Borum has been with Patrice & Associates for 10 months. With more than a decade of experience in staffing and recruitment process management, Borum has had continued success in recruiting valuable managerial talent for her restaurant and hospitality clients.

As the restaurant and hospitality sectors continue to grow, Patrice & Associates remains the most equipped staffing agency in the country to connect North America’s premier restaurant brands with the industry’s promising talent. The firm’s Regional Developer and franchise opportunities provide entrepreneurs with a ground-level opportunity to strike while the iron is hot in the rapidly growing restaurant industry.

To learn more about Patrice & Associates and available franchise opportunities, please visit www.patriceandassociates.com or call (301) 327-5059.

About Patrice & Associates
As the preeminent hospitality recruiting service in the U.S. since 1989, Patrice & Associates helps thousands of managerial candidates every year find rewarding jobs in the restaurant and hospitality industry. The company has exclusive recruiting partnerships with some the nation’s largest restaurant chains and hotels to ensure those hospitality venues recruit the top managers in their industry. Currently, there are more than 45 franchise units across dozens of states. Patrice & Associates is growing its franchise base dramatically in the next few years, expecting to add more than 100 franchisees to help fill 1,100 open territories nationwide. For more information about Patrice & Associates, visit www.patriceandassociates.com.

NRA to challenge New York City salt labeling rules

The National Restaurant Association will file a lawsuit this week to challenge New York City’s new rules, effective Tuesday, that require a salt shaker icon on many chain restaurant menus, the association said Tuesday.

New York City’s Board of Health voted unanimously in September to require restaurants with 15 or more units nationwide to add warning labels — a salt shaker in a triangle — on menu items that exceed the recommended daily limit of 2,300 milligrams of sodium.

 

The rules went into effect Tuesday, and violators will face a $200 fine. New York is the nation’s first city to require the sodium labels.

“While the Board of Health thinks they are targeting corporate chains, in reality they are dealing yet another blow to many of New York’s small businesses that have been working and continue to work hard to provide nutritional access to their customers,” said Christin Fernandez, an NRA spokeswoman, in an emailed statement. “That is why we are taking legal action against this latest assault which goes too far, too fast for New York’s restaurant community.”

Many multi-unit restaurant brands had complied with the new rules by Tuesday.

Dr. Mary T. Bassett, commissioner of the New York City Department of Health, tweeted a thank you to Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar on Monday, including a photograph of the chain’s menu with the salt symbol. She included the hashtag #WatchTheSalt.

Zane Tankel, chairman and CEO of New York-area Applebee’s franchisee Apple-Metro, was quoted in an NBC report as saying that the icon gives customers more information. “I think it’s important that we give them the opportunity to make the right decisions,” Tankel said.

Fernandez of the NRA said the restaurant industry has been committed to lower-sodium options for customers.

“As an association, we advocated for a uniform national menu-labeling standard on behalf of the industry. We believe consumers should have the same access to nutritional information from Portland, Maine, to Portland, Ore.,” she said.

Fernandez said mandates like those in New York City “unravel that uniformity.”

DineEquity Inc. said 48 of its IHOP and Applebee’s restaurants were affected by the rules.

“We want to provide guests choices and information so they can make the best decisions for their personal circumstances. The information provided under this rule has been readily available, and accessed by our guests, for a very long time. We believe customers are best served by a uniform national standard, and we have that under the Affordable Care Act,” Patrick Lenow, DineEquity vice president for communications and public affairs, said in a statement.

In addition to putting the salt-shaker icon on menu items, restaurants must post a warning next to the point of sale that states: “The sodium (salt) content of this item is higher than the total daily recommended limit (2,300 mg). High sodium intake can increase blood pressure and risk of heart disease and stroke.”

The average American consumes about 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day, the Centers for Disease Control reports. The Federal Drug Administration recommends some adults — especially those who suffer hypertension, are African-American or age 51 or older — to limit their sodium intake to 1,500 milligrams a day.

New York City has regulated menu items in the past, banning trans fats and requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts. The city’s effort to ban the sale of sodas and sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces was rejected in June 2014 by the state supreme court.

Update: Dec. 1, 2015  This story has been updated with a comment from DineEquity Inc.

Contact Ron Ruggless at Ronald.Ruggless@Penton.com.
Follow him on Twitter: @RonRuggless

New York Eleven Madison Park Restaurant doing away with tipping

stockrestaurantcheck2015promoThe movement to do away with tipping in New York gained steam with the announcement Tuesday that fine-dining restaurant Eleven Madison Park will move to a model in which service is included in menu prices.

Eleven Madison Park owner Will Guidara told Eater NY that he would raise the price of the restaurant’s prix-fixe menu to $295 from $225 in the new year, when minimum wage rates in New York City rise $2.50, to $7.50 per hour, for tipped employees, and increase 25 cents, to $9, for non-tipped employees.

Guidara said he would keep tipping in place at his á la carte restaurant, The NoMad, also in New York.

The movement to do away with tipping was given a shot in the arm earlier this year when respected restaurateur Danny Meyer said he would gradually eliminate tipping at all of his 13 full-service restaurants, starting in November with The Modern at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Guidara worked for Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group for many years, including a stint as general manager of The Modern. He was later appointed general manager of Eleven Madison Park and ended up buying the restaurant from USHG, in partnership with executive chef Daniel Humm, in 2011.

Advocates for eliminating tipping say the model is antiquated, devalues the professionalism of servers, and creates pay imbalance between front- and back-of-house staff.

Several restaurants across the country had previously eliminated tipping, but most did it by adding an automatic service charge rather than raising menu prices. Others, including The Lazy Bear in San Francisco and Alinea and Next in Chicago, have started selling all-inclusive, non-refundable tickets, doing away both with the need to tip and preventing no-shows.

Joe’s Crab Shack, a 131-unit casual-dining seafood chain owned by Ignite Restaurant Group Inc., has been testing a no-tipping policy at 18 of its restaurants for several months, taking Meyer’s approach of raising prices instead of adding a service charge while increasing the hourly wage of front-of-the-house staff. Ray Blanchette, CEO of the Houston-based company, told Nation’s Restaurant News earlier that he expected turnover to fall and teamwork to improve.

Meyer told NRN earlier that with the increase in minimum wage and resulting higher menu prices, the wage gap between cooks and servers would rise even further, something he could address by doing away with tipping.

Contact Bret Thorn at bret.thorn@penton.com.
Follow him on Twitter: @foodwriterdiary